The study sought to build evidence, based on what is already being implemented to address the challenge, in terms of what works in fostering better employment outcomes for young people who struggle to navigate labour market pathways. Drawing on the social development approach and youth development lens, which prioritises the agency of young people, we developed a conceptual framework to understand how YEPs and a financial capability intervention might improve outcomes for young people. Following a pre- and post-test study design, complemented with in-depth qualitative data, the evidence provides insight both into what programme features play a role, and how a financial capability intervention shapes outcomes for YEP participants, and seems to suggest that both have an important role to play as one of a suite of ALMPs to address youth unemployment.

Source: This study was originally published in June 2019 and authored by Lauren Graham, Leila Patel, Gina Chowa, Zoheb Khan, Rainier Masa, Senzelwe Mthembu and Leilanie Williams. In collaboration with the Centre for Social Development in Africa, University of Johannesburg, and Global Social Development Innovations, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

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